Bartholomew shaped the sound that became rock and roll

With this week’s show, I try to capture in music the place in rock and roll history of Dave Bartholomew, who passed away recently. You can get the show started now and then read on.

Born on Christmas Eve in 1918, Dave Bartholomew was already a bandleader by the time he entered the Army during World War II. As a member of the 196th Army Ground Forces Band, he gained experience in writing and arranging music. By the end of the 40’s with the war over and with folks ready to dance, he led one of the hottest bands in New Orleans becoming part of the evolution of swing into R&B.

Fats Domino (left) and Dave Bartholomew generated a mountain of hits, all recorded from studios run by Cosimo Matassa.

The pivotal year for him was 1950 when he released his first big hit “Country Boy “(which starts the first full set of the show) and he met, recruited into the studio and recorded Fats Domino, scoring a big hit right out of the box with “The Fat Man” (also featured in the first set). His 14-year work relationship with Domino became one of the most celebrated collaborations in rock and roll. Bartholomew wrote and co-wrote many of Domino’s songs, arranged the horns, performed on his records and basically managed the musicians both in the studio and on tour.

During this time, he worked with many other New Orleans artists through his relationship with Lew Chudd and Imperial Records. One of of these talents was Smiley Lewis who you’ll hear singing the original recording of “Blue Monday.” Other artists were Pee Wee Crayton, Shirley and Lee, Snooks Eaglin and Lloyd Price (for Specialty Records). You’ll hear them all performing songs written or arranged by Bartholomew.

A fine musician (trumpet) and singer, Bartholomew was inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame as a non-performer in 1991 — largely because of his deep involvement with Cosimo Matassa’s J&M studio in New Orleans and, according to his Hall of Fame bio, his ability to shape “the rhythmic orientation of that city into a sound everyone would come to know and love as rock and roll.”

I finish out my Bartholomew segment with covers of Bartholomew/Domino songs by Galactic, George Porter Jr., the Roamin’ Jasmine and Allen Toussaint. Federal streaming rules limit how many songs I can play of one artists so I didn’t play “My Ding-a-Ling” a Bartholomew song made famous by Chuck Berry. In prepping for the show, I noticed a fairly significant difference between Berry’s version and Bartholomew’s. While Berry caught some controversy over the suggestive lyrics of his version, he probably would have gotten in even more trouble had he used the lyrics sung by Bartholomew in the original recording.

Bartholomew’s family carries on the tradition of music making. Here is an OffBeat Magazine article that tells you more.

The rest of the show focuses on the music of Louisiana acts that will be performing in the Northwest this summer. I hope you have the chance to see one of these artists live. Here’s the schedule. Thanks for tuning in.

Mac (Dr. John) and Spencer Bohren tributes highlight show

New Orleans lost two well-regarded musical artists in early June. One you know about and one you should know about. Get the show started to hear what they have to offer

Mac Rebennak’s death on June 6 at age 77 garnered international headlines. The Jesuit High School dropout was a regular presence at the J&M Studios during its heyday and later joined the secret “Wrecking Crew” of studio fame. While he rocketed to fame with his Dr. John the day tripper persona in the late 60’s and early 70’s, it was his commitment to the New Orleans funk, R&B and groove that endeared him to his hometown.

Today’s show features his singing as well as his ability on guitar and piano. The show kicks off with him singing a Davell Crawford number, with the younger songwriter playing piano. Then we go to one of the first songs he wrote, performed by Jerry Byrne, “Light’s Out.” From there, you will hear “Storm Warning” an instrumental that shows off his guitar licks (before he lost a part of finger (fret hand) to a gunshot.

Other sets includes Dr. John singing and/or playing piano with Irma Thomas, Sonny Landreth, and Tab Benoit. In all, its close to a full hour of his music.

Spencer Bohren from crowd-funding website designed to help pay for his cancer treatment.

Then we turn to Spencer Bohren, a singer-songwriter who was born in Wyoming with ties to the Northwest but moved to New Orleans as a young man with his wife in the 70’s. He gained fame throughout the city and in Europe but is not nearly as well known as Mac Rebennak. Bohren died two days after Dr. John and left a strong library of solo performances as well as collaborative efforts. You’ll hear three of his solo songs, two songs he wrote for “The Write Brothers” and a rousing performance in the rockabilly group he was part of “Rory Danger and the Danger Dangers.”

The show offers some previews of performances coming to the northwest with songs by the Soul Rebels, Chubby Carrier and Trombone Shorty. I finish the show with Dr. John’s performance with The Dirty Dozen Brass Band “It’s All Over Now.”

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Crawfish, New Tracks, and a Germaine Performance & more

Marcia Ball kicks off this week’s show with “Crawfishin'” which I play in honor of the fact that we’re now in the height of the mud bug season. But there’s more mouth-watering songs in the show so get it started and then read more of what’s on the menu.

Latest Smoking Time Jazz Club record

Smoking Time Jazz Club is proving to a prolific recording group as well as a live performance band. In the first full set, check out “Snake Hip Dance” from their barely released Contrapuntal Stomp. Tom Worrell lays down “Crawfish Fiesta” from a live performance of piano night, the WWOZ benefit that happens between the two weekends of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. (This year, it looks like the event has moved to House of Blues).

I start the second full set with Leyla McCalla’s “Money is King” from her latest The Capitalist Blues . That set is all new music including Big Al and the Heavyweights doing “Fool for You” and Herlin Riley’s wonderful funky jazz number “Wings and Roots.”

Later in the show, you’ll hear Little Queenie, Tuts Washington, Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, James Booker, and Miss Sophie Lee. I spin two more tracks from the Smithsonian Folkways not-yet-released 50 year anniversary of Jazz Fest with a big band performance by Al Belletto and a birthday spin (she turn’s 87!) of Germaine Bazzle scatting with Red Tyler’s Quintet.

At about the hour mark, you’ll hear the Hot 8 Brass Band’s sweaty dance anthem “Get Up” — the 20th anniversary version and then later to end the show I play the Diesel remix of that song — which was recently featured in a soccer highlight show “Match of the Week.”

Oh I left stuff out of this description so you’ll have some surprises along the way. Thanks for listening. Please subscribe and tell ALL your friends about Gumbo YaYa.

Your 2018 New Orleans Music Buying Guide

Here’s a list of 2018 releases from New Orleans musicians for you to consider and you can listen to them with my latest show. No rational order to the list other than this is the order you’ll hear them on the show, which you can start right now. The song played is in italics.

The Big Dixie Swingers: Ranch Stressing – A fiddler and crooning banjoist backed up by trumpet, clarinet and drums perform a collection of pre-war Western Swing, Country Blues, and popular songs.  Razz Matazz Soup

Big Sam’s Funky Nation: Songs in the Key of Funk: Volume One – Trombonist Big Sam Williams brings back the funk for his latest release with his actively touring band.  Dance to the CD then dance to him when he comes through your area. “Who’s Gonna Help Brother Get Further”

Sean ArdoinKreole Rock and Soul Ardoin’s grammy nominated release of  soul, rock and pop songs, all with a distinctive creole flavor, is designed to get you to dance — instructional dance video included. “Kick Rocks”

Marcia Ball: Shine Bright  – Her dual Texas and Louisiana musicianship status is on full display in support of a seasoned voice that leaves no doubt of the veracity of her songs. “I Got to Find Somebody”

Jonathon Long: Jonathon Long –  In his third release, this Baton Rouge-based guitarist and singer has seen “the light” and put more emphasis on his songwriting and singing.  A damn good idea well executed  by producer Samantha Fish. “The Light”

Ever More Nest: The Place That You Call Home  –  Kelcy Mae’s latest project offers a deeply intimate perspective on the saying “there’s no place like home.” This Shreveport native lives and works in New Orleans and recorded this beautiful album in Nashville for a national audience. “Broken Bones”

Tin Men:  Sing with Me – Washboard Chaz anchors and lends his voice to this unique trio which showcases the fascinating songs of Alex McMurray (guitar and vocals) and the sousaphone wizardry of Matt Perrine.  “Scraper Man”

Riverside Jazz Collective: Stomp Off, Let’s Go – Recorded at the Ellis Marsalis Center for Music by New Orleans pros who can  be heard regularly around town, particularly at The Bombay Club, this album features gently time-worn “songs that are melodically and emotionally durable.”  “Ready for the River”

Sabertooth Swing: Extinct Possibilities – Another sharp traditional New Orleans jazz band that manages to make it all sound fresh and fun. “Alcohol”

Bon Bon Vivant: Live At The New Orleans Jazz Museum – Enjoyable sister harmonies, genre-bending style and a clear affection for New Orleans history performed before the perfect live audience. “The Jazz Axe Man”

Jon Cleary: Dyna-Mite – If you’ve been waiting for Cleary’s full band follow up to his 2016 Grammy win, wait no more!  – “Dyna-Mite”

Ivan Neville and Cris Jacobs: Neville Jacobs – New Orleans funk and soul meets Baltimore rock and blues.  I hope its not a one off. “Make Up of a Fool”

Gal Holiday: Lost & Found – Vanessa Neuman, aka Gal Holiday, lays down a tasty selection of mostly original honky tonk country tunes. “Come Home”

Ghalia & Mama’s Boys: Let the Demons Out  – Energetic vocals of Belgium-born Ghalia Vauthier, who has been mining the Mississippi River blues scene for this release — well supported by Johnny Mastro & Mama’s Boys.  “Hoodo Evil Man”

Little Freddie King: Fried Rice & Chicken – Straight, no chaser blues by a man who is still a treasured member of the Ninth Ward live music scene. “Mean Little Woman”

Old Riley & Water:  Biting Through –  Gritty, fuzzy, stripped down blues from a group I hadn’t heard of till the album turned up at KAOS — they regularly perform at House of Blues in New Orleans.  “Trouble”

Keith Stone with Red Gravy: Blues with a Taste of New Orleans – Keith Stone has clearly made it back home with this solid cast of musicians delivering exactly what the album title promises, with an extra serving of red gravy. “Blue Eyed Angel”

Eric Lindell: Revolution in Your Heart – Another great release of southern R&B. This time, Lindell plays just about every instrument. “Grandpa Jim”

Ted Hefko and the Thousandaires: Gas Station Guru – Saxophonist/bandleader Hefko takes you through a laid back set of R&B, blues and jazz that is steeped in New Orleans. “The Roofer”

Shawn Williams:   Motel Livin’ – Falling somewhere near the alt-country zone, her second album is a gripping compendium of lyrical songs that may leave you a bit unnerved but fully entertained. “Best of Me”

Helen Gillet: Helkiase– A French and English singing cellist with a strong attraction to improvisation, jazz, funk and New Orleans, Gillet’s latest project can be edgy, melodic, soothing and tense.  Check out her KAOS studio performance  and interview from this summer. “Vautour”

Cyril Neville: Endangered Species: The Essential Recordings:If you’re not a close follower of the most soulful and political of the Neville brothers, then this release serves as a nice sampler of his five releases from his Endangered Species label. “Ayiti”

Cha Wa: Spyboy – Waiting for the next generation to pick up the mantle for The Wild Magnolias (but perhaps with more brass!) Look no further then this second release of this millennial group that has the fire!  Grammy nominated too.  “Get On Out Of the Way” 

Michot’s Melody Makers: Blood Moon – Cajun music for new ears, and broad-minded old ones, crafted with respect to tradition. “La Lune est Croche”

Lena Prima:  Prima La Famiglia You don’t have to be Italian to enjoy Lena’s reconnection with her roots. They’re songs her father would sing but this time, its her voice. “Come On A My House”

Jon BatisteHollywood Africans – If you’re a fan of “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” you know what he looks like.  The late night show bandleader provides a much deeper glance with this release featuring solo piano and singing.  “Don’t Stop”

Louie Ludwig‘sTroll Factory” – No album this year from this politically impish New Orleans songwriter and video maker but his proletariat perspective of this new world sweat shop hits it out of the proverbial Zenit Arena.  If you like, check out his YouTube Channel.

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Female New Orleans Artists take the Gumbo YaYa stage

Every year, I’ve done a show featuring exclusively female artists and every time I do it, I ask myself why I don’t it more often. This show is awesome so get it started and then read on.

It’s not that I don’t play these artists at other times. In fact, I play them frequently but some times its nice just to give these wonderful musicians the full spotlight — without the guys in the way.  And each year, as I learn more about the New Orleans music scene, the show gets better.

This show starts in the delightful embrace of Ingrid Lucia’s  “My Honey’s Lovin’ Arms.”  And the show just keeps getting better.  Lynn Drury, who is featured later in the show, joins Margie Perez, Monica McIntyre, and Paula August Jepson  in  “Got to Tell Ya” from The Honeypots-– an album I found in my last foray through the Louisiana Music Factory.  I follow that with songs by  Aurora Nealand and the Royal Roses and Marva Wright.  

For this show, I emphasized all, or mostly all, women bands and bands fronted by women. Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue scores on both fronts. She has a talented team backing her up including a female bass player and drummer.  In all, I spin 26 tracks by female artists from New Orleans, including Rosie Ledet, Gina Forsyth, Yvette Landry, Dana Abbott, Albanie Falletta, Helen Gillet, and, of course, Irma Thomas.

Also, the best-known (if not only) all female brass band from New Orleans, the Original Pinettes Brass Band crank out their own version of “Who You Gonna Call.”

Inspired by the release of the documentary,  “How They Got Over,”   about African-American gospel quartets and their role in rock n’ roll, I do a set of spirituals starting with the all-female gospel quartet, Southern Harps – – Zion Trinity and Mahalia Jackson fill out that uplifting set.

Stay tuned for my Thanksgiving show which is already in the can and ready to be posted early next week.  Thanks for listening.

Dr. Ford and Joan Jett inspired Gumbo YaYa Show

I can’t imagine the courage it takes to sit in front of a national audience and talk about a painful past trauma, nor can I imagine the determination required to break into a male-dominated pop culture field. Start my show and read on about the two women who subconsciously affected this week’s show.

danielle nicole
Danielle Nicole, bass player and singer for Trampled by Turtles, has a solo career with early recordings hat feature New Orleans musicians.

No theme this week.  I just selected some strong tracks and was getting them lined up on my Thursday morning show.  But that was also the day that Dr. Christine Blasey Ford sat before a mostly male Senate panel and talked about a painful episode in her life that she still carries with her today.  With the 24-hour news cycle bombarding me with the latest development, it was hard not to think about her and the courage such action takes.

Add that to my experience the night before where I had attended the premiere of the Joan Jett documentary, “Bad Reputation.”   The story of Jett’s path as a female rocker was enlightening. It was because of her movie that I pulled from the KAOS blues shelf a neglected copy of  Ghalia and Mama’s Boys to kick off the show.  (Actually, I start with  the Radiators but she’s the first one I introduce.)

And in the seething anger of the moment (I broadcast live on KAOS right after “Democracy Now” which on the day of my show reported on stories of women molested by men who got away with it), I picked the track “Hoodoo Evil Man”.

Singer/Songwriter/Rocker Ghalia is from Brussels but she recorded the song in New Orleans with Johnny Mastro and Mama’s Boys.  That’s close enough for me. Also, in this week’s show, I play other female rockers including Danielle Nicole, who is from Kansas and was lead singer for Trampled by Turtles. Nicole did a release with Galactic drummer Stanton Moore and New Orleans blues-rocker Anders Osborne that included the song, “Didn’t Do You No Good.”

I didn’t set out to do a show focusing on women rockers and to be honest, this show is more spiced rather than infused with women performers. (About once a year, I do an exclusively female show. Here’s the last one.) But this show includes a new release by Kelcy Mae’s latest project, two tracks by Kara Grainger. Aurora Kneeland’s alter ego “Rory Danger and the Danger Dangers,” Gal Holiday, Albanie Falletta, the Original Pinettes, Rosie Ledet, and a rocking song by Irma Thomas.

 

Big Sam delivers on promise of more dance music

Big Sam’s Funky Nation visits the Northwest this week so this show features two of his songs and a short interview with the band’s charismatic frontman Sam Williams. Let’s get started and I’ll tell you more.

bigsamjazzfest2016k
Big Sam’s Funky Nation

Big Sam just got back from a tour of Spain when I talked with him today about his trip to the west coast. He leaves tomorrow (Friday, August 3rd) for San Francisco. He’ll play Mississippi Studio in Portland on Monday, August 6 and the Nectar Lounge in Seattle on Tuesday, August 7.

We talked about how he lost his prized trombone when his touring van got broken into last time he came out to the west. We also talked about how Wendell Pierce copied some of his moves and his style when he played Antoine Batiste in the HBO TV show Treme. In fact the broad outline of the character was patterned after Mr. Williams.

Big Sam’s Funky Nation’s new release Songs in the Key of Funk  delivers on his earlier promise to include more dance songs. In this show, I play “What’s My Name (Big Sam” and “Buzzin.” But to get those songs and the interview, you have to listen to few other sets including a set of Led Zeppelin cover songs featuring a sousaphone on “Dyer Maker” and a three trombone salute to “When the Levee Breaks.”

Rolling with the HBO theme, Davis Rogan sings about the hassles of fake pot when acting in a song called “Prop Weed.” Also, this show includes my favorite version of St. James Infirmary, a rocking version led by Clint Maedgen and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band

Helen Gillet performs on Gumbo YaYa and at Olympia concert

Jazz-based cellist, singer, composer and improviser Helen Gillet graced the KAOS studio during my July 12, 2018 show.  She also performs this evening in my backyard.  Go ahead and get the radio show started which begins with Jon Cleary’s new song “Big Greasy.”

helen

Helen is a total pro.  Despite feeling under the weather, she braved I-5 traffic and arrived exactly when she said she would.  She set up quickly with the help of our talented KAOS Music Department and as a result, we got to spend over an hour together on the air talking about her music, New Orleans and she performed one of my favoriteH’s (“Atchafalaya”).

She also talked a bit about her experience learning the cello in Singapore and the difficulties with how to categorize her music which is so difficult to define yet so pleasing to listen to.

I’m sorry if you missed the Olympia concert. Subscribe to the blog to make sure you don’t miss the next one.

Here is just the interview and music of Helen Gillet:

 

Here’s a glimpse into New Orleans country music scene

Two June CD releases are burnishing the city’s country music reputation and you’ll hear tracks from both in today’s show. Start it rolling and then learn more about Shawn Williams and Gal Holiday.

shawn williamsShawn Williams’ second album Motel Livin’ is a gripping compendium of lyrical songs that leave me a bit unnerved but fully entertained.  Her voice haunts and I’m going to enjoy digging deeper into this new release.  I play “Best of Me” and later “Buried Alive.”

More upbeat and more battle worn is Gal Holiday and her Honky Tonk Revue with the new release Lost & Found. Almost a decade before The Deslondes formed, Gal Holiday (aka Vanessa Niemann) broke ground on the new wave of country in New Orleans. And true to her band’s name, you can dance to her music. I play “Found Myself Instead” and “Desert Disco.”

While Luke Winslow-King’s music has been difficult to describe, I’ve never thought of it as country until his latest release Blue Mesa. You can listen to his “After the Rain” and decide for yourself.

To keep the roots vibe rolling, I follow these sets up with The Big Dixie Swingers with “I Haven’t Got a Pot,” Eric Lindell with a live version of “Bayou Country” and The Radiators doing “Straight Eight.”  Also, an encore performance of Albanie Falletta who charmed the smart attendees of her concert at Traditions Cafe in Olympia Sunday night.

Jazz sets follow and if you’re patient enough I finish with Dash Rip Rock’s “Let’s Go Smoke Some Pot” in honor of the State of Oklahoma adopting a medical cannabis initiative this week.

Oh and I almost forgot, while digging through the KAOS studio’s vinyl vault I found Danny Barker’s 1988 release Save the Bones  and I played his version of “St. James Infirmary.” Struck by his riffing on the traditional lyrics description of his funeral, I thought about Fred Johnson’s  description of how Danny Barker’s traditional funeral came about that I recorded in October of 2017 in his office in New Orleans.  You’ll get to hear the story as well on this show.

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June Yamagishi delivers excellent argument for open borders

June Yamagishi shocked his agent when he announced that despite a revered career as a guitarist in Japan, he wanted to live and work in New Orleans. On the occasion of his 65th birthday, this episode of Sweeney’s Gumbo YaYa celebrates his decision. But wait there’s more. (But go ahead and get the show started)

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June Yamagishi playing with Cyril Neville and Corey Henry in October 2017.

Chocolate Milk, a popular New Orleans funk band from the 70’s, kick the show off with their opening song from their 2010 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival performance.  I follow that up with a set of music featuring June Yamagishi and his guitar. Two tracks from Papa Grows Funk, a band he was part of for 13 years. Because he also loves Mardi Gras Indian music, I included a song by The Wild Magnolias that features some strong Yamagishi licks.

Also, here’s a link to a short video of his cameo appearance on the HBO show, Treme, where he is trying out for the band being assembled by Wendell Pierce’s character.

From this point in the show, I swing through a jazz set that starts with a classic King Oliver number from the late 1920’s and finishes with a recent recording by Preservation Hall Jazz Band featuring an original song.

Coco Robicheaux kicks off the next set which offers two songs about the importance of keeping on the good side of your woman. Paula of Paula and the Pontiacs sings about the importance of getting the coffee (grind) right while Larry Garner, with help from Buckwheat Zydeco, does a number called “Ms. Boss.”

Three contemporary zydeco and cajun numbers push the boundaries of those genres with the help of Bonsoir Catin, the Lost Bayou Ramblers and Rosie Ledet.  A country/folk sets follows before I swing back into funk and finish with a genre-busting song by the BlueBrass Project.   Actually, Irma Thomas gets the last word with “Since I Fell for You,” with Dr. John on piano.

There now, lots of reasons to keep listening.  Thanks for tuning in.