Piano, Scat and Blues for this week’s show

champion jackChampion Jack Dupree scats through this week’s opening number with “Skit Skat”  from his 1991 Rounder release, Forever and Ever.  While he lived over 30 years in Europe, Dupree learned his piano in New Orleans. Later in the show, Jon Cleary sings ” Hit, Git, Quit, Split.” For right now, I hope you just “hit” the  show’s start button and forget the rest of his advice.

Dr. Michael White (clarinet) and Matt Perrine (sousaphone) add the New Orleans feel to Portland-based blues guitarist Mary Flower’s hilarious rendition of “Main Street Blues” to start the first full set.  She’s followed by a Boswell Sister cover energetically performed live at the New Orleans Mint by Bon Bon Vivant (“Shout Sister, Shout).

From his latest release Dyna-Mite, Cleary kicks off the second full set which is anchored by Glen David Andrews performing the “Brothers Johnson Jam” at Three Muses.  In later sets, John Lisi, Mem Shannon and Bonerama liven things up, along with Dash Rip Rock, Buddy Flett, and the Dirty River Bourbon Band.   I hope you keep listening. Here’s the full playlist.

“Sunny Afternoon” Seemed to Fit the Day’s News

On a day when Amazon announced it was suspending its work on two of its Seattle office buildings in response to a possible city housing affordability tax, it seemed appropriate to play a cover of Ray Davies satirical “Sunny Afternoon.” It’s the second song in the show, right after Shamarr Allen’s opener, so get it started while I explain more about this show.

I love this version by Debbie Davis and the Mesmerizers with the sousaphone bass line handled by her husband Matt Perrine.  Matt shows up later in the show with his own project, Matt Perrine and Sunflower City.  Yes, its a sunny day but the song, originally recorded by the Kinks, seems to capture Amazon’s petulant response to the city’s modest attempt to try to get the $700 billion company to take some responsibility for the housing shortages in Seattle.

Enough politics, let’s talk immigration instead.  Anders Osborne moved to New Orleans as youth from Uddevalla, Sweden.  Today, he turned 52 and I play his song “My Old Heart.” The Dirty Bourbon River Show’s “Ruffian Since Birth” provides a nice follow up to Osborne’s number

Diablo’s Horns offers a silly take on addiction (and seasonal allergies) in their song “The Sneeze” and The Crooked Vines heat things up with “Organ Holler.”  I’m almost done with my sequential march through Marcia Ball’s latest release Shine Bright and perhaps my favorite surprise in this show was finding Bon Bon Vivant’s latest release and playing “Dust.”

Another fun discovery is Mary Flower’s “Main Street Blues” which features Dr. Michael White (clarinet), Washboard Chaz and Matt Perrine (sousaphone).  Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe.  Cheers.